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Handshakes transmit more bacteria than fist bumps do, according to a new study. Comments from Facebook are edited for clarity and grammar:

We are confronted with germs daily that our immune system continually fights off. A fist bump is a good, informal way of recognizing friends, but a bump in a formal business meeting would be odd.

I'd rather shake hands than to peck each other on the cheek, twice. For those who are concerned about the transferring of germs? Wash your hands.

— David Leung

I stopped shaking hands at trade shows about 10 years ago or more (when SARS was prevalent). I find that a small bow works great, especially in Asia.

Not touching one another in this age of infectious viruses or bacteria seems to be quite evolved, not to mention respectful of your boss or your client.

Chas Mblvdo

Waving is even safer than fist bumping, and calling would be even safer than that. But since when was getting some dirt on your hands such a bad thing? If we don't get exposed, then how would we build up immunity? Should we just wear face masks in public? A study on this topic seems to be a waste of money.

Gerel Gruber

Try to go to an interview doing fist bumps. How many people have died from shaking hands? I am going to keep shaking hands.

Michael McGee

There's more in a handshake than a simple greeting; it's a form of communication that goes far beyond a fist bump. A fist bump is superficial, but a handshake communicates warmth, humanity and friendship. Our society continues to devolve.

Will Malven

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